Tag: ADO

ADO – Migrating a Repository to Azure Repos (and keeping your commit history)

The most direct way to migrate a repo into Azure Repos is to create a new, blank repository. This may mean making a new project. From the organization’s main page, click “New project”

Or it may mean making a new repo in an existing project. From an existing repo, click the drown-down next to the repo name and select “New repository”

Name the repository but don’t add a README. We want a blank repo

Note the URL to the repository – in this case, it’s https://ado0255@dev.azure.com/ado0255/History%20Test/_git/Another%20History%20Test

Find the URL for your existing Git repo – if you cd into the project’s folder and run “git remote -v”, you will get a list of the repos. Make a new folder somewhere – this is a temporary staging area to move the data from your existing repo over to the new Azure Repo. Change directories into your new folder. Run git clone –mirror URLToOldRepo

You will see data being downloaded from your git server.

Change directories into the folder that just got downloaded. You won’t see your code like you normally do when you clone a git repo. You’re looking at the underlying git stuff that makes up the repo. You’re code is all in there, as are all of the branches and commit history.

Now add the new Azure Repo as a remote – in this case, I’m naming the remote “ado”. Then run “git push ado –all” to push everything up to the new Azure Repo.

Stuff will transfer – you may be prompted to log into your ADO repository first. Eventually, you’ll see new branches being created on the remote and the process will complete.

Refreshing the Azure Repo, you’ll now see the files.

Selecting “Commits” will display the commit history.

Anyone else using the repo will need to add the new remote. Use “git remote rm origin” to remove the existing origin, then use “git remote add origin url” to add the new Azure Repo as origin.

ADO – Cleaning up test repos and projects

I find the process to delete repositories and projects to be nonintuitive. Since I create a lot of projects and repos for testing and documentation, it’s nice to be able to clean them up when I’m done!

To delete an Azure Repo, navigate to a repo and select the drop-down next to the repo name. Select “Manage repositories”

With your mouse over a repository, there’s a hamburger menu at the right-hand side of the listing. Click it and select “Delete”

You’ll need to type the repository’s full name to activate the delete button.

To delete a project, go to the organization’s home page and select “Organization Settings” from the lower left-hand corner of the screen.

Select “Projects” from the left-hand navigation bar

With your mouse over the project listing, you’ll have a hamburger menu. Click it and select “Delete Project”

You’ll need to type the project name to activate the delete button.

 

ADO Notifications

I’ve been underwhelmed with the notifications I get from Azure DevOps – there are a lot of build-centric notifications, but I don’t use ADO for builds or deployment apart from playing around. And I really don’t care if the silly test project I set up to build and deploy a website worked, failed, or whatever. I was thinking about hooking whatever they’re calling Flow this week up to ADO and building notification workflows.

Fortunately, a coworker mentioned that you can customize notifications in ADO … which, I’d spent a few seconds poking around and didn’t see anything. But I spent more than a few seconds this time and happened across this little ellipsis on the card that pops up when I click the circle with my initials in it. More options!

A new menu flies out; and, look, there’s “Notifications”

Exactly as I’ve observed, there are a lot of build-centric alerts. So I created a new subscription.

Here’s a subscription that I hope will notify me when items assigned to me have updates to activity or comments.