Tag: Fedora

Using the Dell 1350CN On Fedora

We picked up a really nice color laser printer — a Dell 1350CN. It was really easy to add it to my Windows computer — download driver, install, voila there’s a printer. We found instructions for using a Xerox Phaser 6000 driver. It worked perfectly on Scott’s old laptop, but we weren’t able to install the RPM on his new laptop — it insisted that a dependency wasn’t found: libstdc++.so.6 CXXABI_1.3.1

Except, checking the file, CXXABI_1.3.1 is absolutely in there:

2022-09-17 13:04:19 [lisa@fc36 ~/]# strings /usr/lib64/libstdc++.so.6 | grep CXXABI
CXXABI_1.3
CXXABI_1.3.1
CXXABI_1.3.2
CXXABI_1.3.3
CXXABI_1.3.4
CXXABI_1.3.5
CXXABI_1.3.6
CXXABI_1.3.7
CXXABI_1.3.8
CXXABI_1.3.9
CXXABI_1.3.10
CXXABI_1.3.11
CXXABI_1.3.12
CXXABI_1.3.13
CXXABI_TM_1
CXXABI_FLOAT128

We’ve tried using the foo2hbpl package with the Dell 1355 driver to no avail. It would install, but we weren’t able to print. So we returned to the Xerox package.

Turns out the driver package we were trying to use is a 32-bit driver (even though the download says 32 and 64 bit). From a 32-bit perspective, we really didn’t have libstdc++ — a quick dnf install libstdc++.i686 installed the library along with some friends.

Xerox’s rpm installed without error … but, attempting to print, just yielded an error saying that the filter failed. I had Scott use ldd to test one of the filters (any of the files within /usr/lib/cups/filter/Xerox_Phaser_6000_6010/ — it indicated the “libcups.so.2” could not be found. We also needed to install the 32-bit cups-libs.i686 package. Finally, he’s able to print from Fedora 36 to the Dell 1350cn!

 

 

Finding PCI Devices

You can use dmidecode to list all sorts of information about the system — there is a list of device types that you can use with the “-t” option

   Type   Information
   ────────────────────────────────────────────
      0   BIOS
      1   System
      2   Baseboard
      3   Chassis
      4   Processor
      5   Memory Controller
      6   Memory Module
      7   Cache
      8   Port Connector
      9   System Slots
     10   On Board Devices
     11   OEM Strings
     12   System Configuration Options
     13   BIOS Language
     14   Group Associations
     15   System Event Log
     16   Physical Memory Array
     17   Memory Device
     18   32-bit Memory Error
     19   Memory Array Mapped Address
     20   Memory Device Mapped Address
     21   Built-in Pointing Device
     22   Portable Battery
     23   System Reset
     24   Hardware Security
     25   System Power Controls
     26   Voltage Probe
     27   Cooling Device
     28   Temperature Probe
     29   Electrical Current Probe
     30   Out-of-band Remote Access
     31   Boot Integrity Services
     32   System Boot
     33   64-bit Memory Error
     34   Management Device
     35   Management Device Component
     36   Management Device Threshold Data
     37   Memory Channel
     38   IPMI Device
     39   Power Supply
     40   Additional Information
     41   Onboard Devices Extended Information
     42   Management Controller Host Interface

Blah

[lisa@fedora ~/]# dmidecode -t 9

Handle 0x0024, DMI type 9, 17 bytes
System Slot Information
Designation: Slot6
Type: 32-bit PCI
Current Usage: In Use
Length: Short
ID: 6
Characteristics:
3.3 V is provided
Opening is shared
PME signal is supported
Bus Address: 0000:0a:02.0

The “Bus Address” value corresponds to information from lspci:

[lisa@fedora ~/]# lspci | grep “0a:02.0”
0a:02.0 Multimedia video controller: Conexant Systems, Inc. CX23418 Single-Chip MPEG-2 Encoder with Integrated Analog Video/Broadcast Audio Decoder

Useful DNF Commands

Beyond basic stuff like “dnf install somepackage” or downloading an rpm and using “dnf install my.package.rpm”, this is a running list of useful dnf commands.

List installed packages (similar to rpm -qa):

dnf list installed

List packages with updates available:

dnf check-update

Update everything but the kernel:
dnf update -x kernel*

Find package that provides something:

[lisa@rhel1 ~/]# dnf whatprovides cdrskin
Last metadata expiration check: 2:35:57 ago on Fri 12 Aug 2022 11:37:43 AM EDT.
cdrskin-1.5.2-2.fc32.x86_64 : Limited cdrecord compatibility wrapper to ease migration to libburn
Repo : fedora
Matched from:
Provide : cdrskin = 1.5.2-2.fc32

cdrskin-1.5.4-2.fc32.x86_64 : Limited cdrecord compatibility wrapper to ease migration to libburn
Repo : updates
Matched from:
Provide : cdrskin = 1.5.4-2.fc32

Package info, including version

[lisa@rhel1 ~/]# dnf info sendmail
Last metadata expiration check: 2:37:19 ago on Fri 12 Aug 2022 11:37:43 AM EDT.
Available Packages
Name : sendmail
Version : 8.15.2
Release : 43.fc32
Architecture : x86_64
Size : 730 k
Source : sendmail-8.15.2-43.fc32.src.rpm
Repository : fedora
Summary : A widely used Mail Transport Agent (MTA)
URL : http://www.sendmail.org/
License : Sendmail
Description : The Sendmail program is a very widely used Mail Transport Agent (MTA).
: MTAs send mail from one machine to another. Sendmail is not a client
: program, which you use to read your email. Sendmail is a
: behind-the-scenes program which actually moves your email over
: networks or the Internet to where you want it to go.
:
: If you ever need to reconfigure Sendmail, you will also need to have
: the sendmail-cf package installed. If you need documentation on
: Sendmail, you can install the sendmail-doc package.

Show history:

[lisa@rhel1 ~/]# dnf history
ID     | Command line                                                                                                      | Date and time    | Action(s)      | Altered
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   102 | remove liberation-fonts                                                                                           | 2021-11-28 18:44 | Removed        |    3
   101 | remove chromedriver                                                                                               | 2021-11-28 18:44 | Removed        |    2
   100 | remove google-chrome-stable                                                                                       | 2021-11-28 18:44 | Removed        |    1  < 99 | install liberation-fonts | 2021-11-28 18:42 | Install | 1 >
    98 | install chromedriver                                                                                              | 2021-11-28 18:38 | Install        |    2
    97 | remove mediainfo                                                                                                  | 2021-11-16 13:31 | Removed        |    4
    96 | install mediainfo                                                                                                 | 2021-11-16 13:29 | Install        |    4

 

Which brings up an interesting command — you can undo a history step instead of trying to uninstall the list of things you just installed.

dnf history undo 98 -y

Using Screen to Access Console Port

We needed to console into some Cisco access points — RJ45 to USB to plug into the device console port and the laptop’s USB port? Check! OK … now what? Turns out you can use the screen command as a terminal emulator. The basic syntax is screen <port> <baud rate> — since the documentation said to use 9600 baud and the access point showed up on /dev/ttyUSB0, this means running:

 

screen /dev/ttyUSB0 9600

More completely, screen <port> <baud rate>,<7 or 8 bits per byte>,<enable or disable sending flow control>,<enable or disable rcving flow control>,<keep or clear the eight bit in each byte>

screen /dev/ttyUSB0 9600,cs8,ixon,ixoff,istrip 
- or - 
screen /dev/ttyUSB0 9600,cs7,-ixon,-ixoff,-istrip

Linux Disk Utilization – Reducing Size of /var/log/sa

We occasionally get alerted that our /var volume is over 80% full … which generally means /var/log has a lot of data, some of which is really useful and some of it not so useful. The application-specific log files already have the shortest retention period that is reasonable (and logs that are rotated out are compressed). Similarly, the system log files rotated through logrotate.conf and logrotate.d/* have been configured with reasonable retention.

Using du -sh /var/log/ showed the /var/log/sa folder took half a gig of space.

This is the daily output from sar (a “daily summary of process accounting” cron’d up with /etc/cron.d/sysstat). This content doesn’t get rotated out with the expected logrotation configuration. It’s got a special configuration at /etc/sysconfig/sysstat — changing the number of days (or, in my case, compressing some of the older files) is a quick way to reduce the amount of space the sar output files consume).

Building Gerbera on Fedora

There is a great deal of documentation available for building Gerbera from source on a variety of Linux flavors. Unfortunately, Fedora isn’t one of those (and the package names don’t exactly match up to let you replace “apt-get” with “yum” and be done). So I am quickly documenting the process we followed to build Gerbera from source.

The Fedora build of Gerbera has the binaries in /usr/bin and the manual build places the gerbera binary in /usr/local/bin — the build updates the unit file to reflect this change, but this means you want to back up any customizations you’ve made to the unit file before running “make install”.

You need the build system — cmake, g++, etc and the devel packages from the following table as required by your build options

Library Fedora Package Required? Note Compile-time option Default
libpupnp libupnp-devel XOR libnpupnp pupnp
libnpupnp Build from source (if needed) XOR libupnp I was only able to locate this as a source, not available from Fedora repos WITH_NPUPNP Disabled
libuuid libuuid-devel Required Not required on *BSD
pugixml pugixml-devel Required XML file and data support
libiconv glibc-headers Required Charset conversion
sqlite3 sqlite-devel Required Database storage
zlib zlib-devel Required Data compression
fmtlib fmt-devel Required Fast string formatting
spdlog spdlog-devel Required Runtime logging
duktape duktape-devel Optional Scripting Support WITH_JS Enabled
mysql mariadb-devel Optional Alternate database storage WITH_MYSQL Disabled
curl libcurl-devel Optional Enables web services WITH_CURL Enabled
taglib taglib-devel Optional Audio tag support WITH_TAGLIB Enabled
libmagic file-devel Optional File type detection WITH_MAGIC Enabled
libmatroska libmatroska-devel Optional MKV metadata required for MKV WITH_MATROSKA Enabled
libebml libebml-devel Optional MKV metadata required for MKV WITH_MATROSKA Enabled
ffmpeg/libav ffmpeg-devel Optional File metadata WITH_AVCODEC Disabled
libexif libexif-devel Optional JPEG Exif metadata WITH_EXIF Enabled
libexiv2 exiv2-devel Optional Exif, IPTC, XMP metadata WITH_EXIV2 Disabled
lastfmlib liblastfm-devel Optional Enables scrobbling WITH_LASTFM Disabled
ffmpegthumbnailer ffmpegthumbnailer-devel Optional Generate video thumbnails WITH_FFMPEGTHUMBNAILER Disabled
inotify glibc-headers Optional Efficient file monitoring WITH_INOTIFY

Then follow the generalized instructions — cd into the folder where you want to run the build and run (customizing the cmake line as you wish):

git clone https://github.com/gerbera/gerbera.git
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ../gerbera -DWITH_MAGIC=1 -DWITH_MYSQL=1 -DWITH_CURL=1 -DWITH_INOTIFY=1 -DWITH_JS=1 -DWITH_TAGLIB=1 -DWITH_AVCODEC=1 -DWITH_FFMPEGTHUMBNAILER=0 -DWITH_EXIF=1 -DWITH_EXIV2=1 -DWITH_SYSTEMD=1 -DWITH_LASTFM=0 -DWITH_DEBUG=1
make -j4
sudo make install

As with the Gerbera binary, the Fedora build places the web content in /usr/share/gerbera and the manual build places the web content into /usr/local/share/gerbera — yes, you can change the paths in the build, and I’m sure you can clue Gerbera into the new web file location. I opted for the quick/easy/lazy solution of running

mv /usr/share/gerbera /usr/share/gerbera/old
ln -s /usr/local/share/gerbera /usr/share/

To symlink the location my config thinks the web components should be located to the new files.

On the first start of Gerbera, SQL scripts may be run to update the database — don’t stop or kill the service during this process there’s no checkpoint restart of the upgrade process. We backed up /etc/gerbera/gerbera.db prior to starting our Gerbera installation. We’ve also wiped the database files to start from scratch and test changes that impacted how items are ingested into the database.

Fin.