Tag: Fedora

Network Manager GUI

You can use nmcli to configure network interfaces controlled by NetworkManager. But, honestly, I don’t see any advantage to learning the cryptic CLI instead of using the cryptic config file stuff I’ve already learned. And yet … I need my server to have /etc/resolv.conf populated when it reboots. So I figured out how to launch the KDE system settings (assuming you’ve got the X display redirected to your host) — systemsettings5

Mine takes a few minutes to render, during which time the window is black and a handful of errors are written out to the console. But it got there eventually, and I was able to edit the network interface.

Using grub rescue to boot machine and repair MBR

Using grub rescue to boot machine and repair MBR

Use “ls” to find your partition list:
ls
(hd0) (hd0,msdos3) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1)

Check the content of each to find your Linux partition:
ls (hd0,msdos3)/
ls (hd0,msdos2)/
ls (hd0,msdos1)/

You want the one with the /boot folder. In our case, this is (hd0,msdos3). The following commands will boot your Linux OS.

set prefix=(hd0,msdos3)/boot/grub2
set root=(hd0,msdos3)
insmod normal
normal

<root password for maintenance>

Use “df” or “mount” to figure out which disk holds the Linux partition. In our case, it is /dev/sdb. You don’t want the partition (e.g. /dev/sdb2) but the disk. The following commands install the grub2 bootloader and build a config file.

grub2-install /dev/sdb
grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

Adding Python to Fedora Alternatives

Gimp installed Python 2.7). Which, of course, took over my system so nothing was using Python 3 anymore. We’ve used ‘alternatives’ to manage the Java installation, and I thought that might be a good solution in case I ever need to use Python 2

Add both Python versions to alternatives:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python3.7 1
[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python2.7 2

Select which one you want to use:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –config python

There are 2 programs which provide ‘python’.

Selection Command
———————————————–
1 /usr/bin/python3.7
+ 2 /usr/bin/python2.7

Enter to keep the current selection[+], or type selection number: 1

And, of course, repeat the process for PIP:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/pip pip /usr/bin/pip2.7 2
[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/pip pip /usr/bin/pip3.7 1

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –config pip

Updating ll alias

Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux have an alias “ll” which uses the long listing format. It’s a quick little tweak that I love, but I generally want to list hidden files too. Seemed easy enough to tweak the alias … but I never had any luck overriding the system setting or finding the source of the alias. Typing “ll -a” gave me what I wanted, although that’s not appreciably easier than typing “ls -al” …

The ll alias is defined in /etc/profile.d/colorls.sh (or colorls.csh if you use the C shell). Add the ‘a’ and “ll” produces a long list format of all files.

lisa@fedora123 ~]# grep “alias ll” /etc/profile.d/colorls.sh
alias ll=’ls -la’ 2>/dev/null
alias ll=’ls -la –color=auto’ 2>/dev/null

Linux Mounts Windows Volumes As Read Only

Since I’ve got a larger hard drive installed, I have both Fedora and Windows in a dual boot configuration. I have a shared NTFS partition for data, but it’s mounted as read-only under Fedora. Turns out that Fedora sees the file system as not cleanly shut down when Windows Fast Boot is enabled. I disabled fast boot in power management, and the shared data volume is mounted rw as expected.

Recovering A Seriously Screwed Up Fedora System

The graphical interface on a Fedora 28 laptop was unavailable — buggered up video device/driver. Change to what used to be called run level 3, and we could not log in! We know the root password, but it would not take it. Single user is password protected too — and we were unable to log in there.

Normal recovery process:

Get to the grub menu, highlight the kernel you want to boot, and hit ‘e’ to edit it. Scroll down. On line that starts with linux16, change “rhgb quiet” to say “rd.break enforcing=0”
ctrl-x to boot

Once you get a shell:
mount -o remount,rw /sysroot
chroot /sysroot

Voila, you’ve got access to your files. Use vi to edit whatever has the box seriously screwed up (passwd if your problem is that you don’t know the root password) and you’re set. We reset the root password just in case. Aaaand … we still couldn’t log in on init 1 or init 3! And at this point I was feeling stubborn about getting logged into the box.

Now you can tweak up the system so it is not using sulogin when booting into single user mode but that isn’t a good way to install network-sourced packages. For some reason, we had to disable selinux before we could log into anything other than the graphical target. I’m sure there is a policy we could have tweaked, but it was far easier to disable the thing, boot into the multi-user target, sort the video driver, and then boot into the graphical target.

Extracting RPM Packages

I’ve encountered a few scenarios of late where I couldn’t install an RPM package but needed its content. One is the security config at work where I have sudo access for cp but not install rights. Sigh! But more recently, I needed to compare a library from an updated package to the currently installed one. Listing package content confirms it is the same file name and path.

[root@fedora02 tmp]# rpm -q --filesbypkg -p ./mariadb-libs-10.2.13-2.fc27.i686.rpm
mariadb-libs              /etc/my.cnf.d/client.cnf
mariadb-libs              /usr/lib/.build-id
mariadb-libs              /usr/lib/.build-id/7c
mariadb-libs              /usr/lib/.build-id/7c/c8e65deafbdcc28b3089da60f295a6f757cf4f
mariadb-libs              /usr/lib/libmariadb.so.3

 

Extracting the rpm allowed me to actually compare the files, swap back and forth to see which worked, etc.

[lisa@fedora tmp]# rpm2cpio mariadb-libs-10.2.13-2.fc27.x86_64.rpm | cpio -idmv