Tag: Fedora

Building LIB_MYSQLUDF_SYS On Fedora 31

I moved my MariaDB server to a new host and could not follow my previously working instructions to build lib_mysqludf_sys. The error indicated that my_atomic.h was not found.

[lisa@server03 lib_mysqludf_sys]# make
gcc -fPIC -Wall -I/usr/include/mysql/server -I. -shared lib_mysqludf_sys.c -o /usr/lib64/mariadb/plugin//lib_mysqludf_sys.so
In file included from /usr/include/mysql/server/my_sys.h:34,
from lib_mysqludf_sys.c:41:
/usr/include/mysql/server/my_pthread.h:26:10: fatal error: my_atomic.h: No such file or directory
26 | #include <my_atomic.h>
| ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
compilation terminated.
make: *** [Makefile:4: install] Error 1

The missing file is located in /usr/include/mysql/server/private … so I had to include that file in the gcc command as well. My new Makefile reads as follows:

[lisa@server03 lib_mysqludf_sys]# cat Makefile
LIBDIR=/usr/lib64/mariadb/plugin/

install:
gcc -fPIC -Wall -I/usr/include/mysql/server -I/usr/include/mysql/server/private -I. -shared lib_mysqludf_sys.c -o $(LIBDIR)/lib_mysqludf_sys.so

I was then able to make and use install.sh to load it into MariaDB.

NVIDIA Driver Installation Issue – Fedora 30

NVIDIA finally released an updated driver for Scott’s laptop — one that should be compatible with the 5.x kernel. Ran through the normal process and got the following error:

     Unable to load the nvidia-drm kernel module

Which … was at least new. Tried running through the installation again but not registering the driver with the kernel. Installation completed successfully, and he’s able to boot the 5.8.100 kernel.

Network Manager GUI

You can use nmcli to configure network interfaces controlled by NetworkManager. But, honestly, I don’t see any advantage to learning the cryptic CLI instead of using the cryptic config file stuff I’ve already learned. And yet … I need my server to have /etc/resolv.conf populated when it reboots. So I figured out how to launch the KDE system settings (assuming you’ve got the X display redirected to your host) — systemsettings5

Mine takes a few minutes to render, during which time the window is black and a handful of errors are written out to the console. But it got there eventually, and I was able to edit the network interface.

Using grub rescue to boot machine and repair MBR

Using grub rescue to boot machine and repair MBR

Use “ls” to find your partition list:
ls
(hd0) (hd0,msdos3) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1)

Check the content of each to find your Linux partition:
ls (hd0,msdos3)/
ls (hd0,msdos2)/
ls (hd0,msdos1)/

You want the one with the /boot folder. In our case, this is (hd0,msdos3). The following commands will boot your Linux OS.

set prefix=(hd0,msdos3)/boot/grub2
set root=(hd0,msdos3)
insmod normal
normal

<root password for maintenance>

Use “df” or “mount” to figure out which disk holds the Linux partition. In our case, it is /dev/sdb. You don’t want the partition (e.g. /dev/sdb2) but the disk. The following commands install the grub2 bootloader and build a config file.

grub2-install /dev/sdb
grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

Adding Python to Fedora Alternatives

Gimp installed Python 2.7). Which, of course, took over my system so nothing was using Python 3 anymore. We’ve used ‘alternatives’ to manage the Java installation, and I thought that might be a good solution in case I ever need to use Python 2

Add both Python versions to alternatives:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python3.7 1
[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python2.7 2

Select which one you want to use:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –config python

There are 2 programs which provide ‘python’.

Selection Command
———————————————–
1 /usr/bin/python3.7
+ 2 /usr/bin/python2.7

Enter to keep the current selection[+], or type selection number: 1

And, of course, repeat the process for PIP:

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/pip pip /usr/bin/pip2.7 2
[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –install /usr/bin/pip pip /usr/bin/pip3.7 1

[lisa@fedora ~]# sudo alternatives –config pip

Updating ll alias

Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux have an alias “ll” which uses the long listing format. It’s a quick little tweak that I love, but I generally want to list hidden files too. Seemed easy enough to tweak the alias … but I never had any luck overriding the system setting or finding the source of the alias. Typing “ll -a” gave me what I wanted, although that’s not appreciably easier than typing “ls -al” …

The ll alias is defined in /etc/profile.d/colorls.sh (or colorls.csh if you use the C shell). Add the ‘a’ and “ll” produces a long list format of all files.

lisa@fedora123 ~]# grep “alias ll” /etc/profile.d/colorls.sh
alias ll=’ls -la’ 2>/dev/null
alias ll=’ls -la –color=auto’ 2>/dev/null

Linux Mounts Windows Volumes As Read Only

Since I’ve got a larger hard drive installed, I have both Fedora and Windows in a dual boot configuration. I have a shared NTFS partition for data, but it’s mounted as read-only under Fedora. Turns out that Fedora sees the file system as not cleanly shut down when Windows Fast Boot is enabled. I disabled fast boot in power management, and the shared data volume is mounted rw as expected.